Top 6 Short Panchatantra Stories for Kids

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short Panchatantra stories

Stories from Kákolùkïyam (Of Crows and Owls)

Short Panchatantra stories – The Panchatantra stories will not only enhance your child’s imagination but also teach them something.

The stories from Kákolùkïyam (Of Crows and Owls) can help kids understand the rules and strategies of war and peace.

These stories also help in linguistic and cognitive development.

Read Also: Panchatantra Stories- Moral Stories for Kids

The Foolish Brahmin and The Crooks

Once upon a time, in a small village lived a brahmin. One day, he performed sacred ceremonies for a rich merchant and got a lamb in return. He began his journey back home, carrying the lamb on his shoulders. The three crooks see him from a distance and decide to trick him to give the lamb to them. Hungry and emaciated, one after the other, the three crooks plan to ask the Brahmin, the same question. Following the plan, the crooks ask the Brahmin that why was he carrying a dog on his back?

The brahmin got angry at the first two crooks and asked them to mind their business. But when the third crook asked the same question again, the foolish Brahmin thought that he must indeed be carrying a dog if three people have told him so. He threw the lamb off without even bothering to look at it. The Brahmin continued his journey back home and the crooks succeeded in their plan.

Short Panchatantra Stories: Moral of the Story

A lie repeated several times, apparently becomes a truth.

 

The Cave That Talked

Once upon a time, there lived a hungry lion in the jungle. In search of food, he found a cave one day. He thought to himself that the cave might be home to a few animals. So, he decided to wait until he finds an animal to prey upon. He quickly hid inside the cave. The cave was a home to a jackal. When the jackal came back home, he noticed the footprints of the lion entering the came. The Jackal could not find the footprints that assured the lion’s exit from the cave. He immediately stepped back and thought of a plan to know if the lion was really inside his cave. The jackal went near the cave and started talking to the cave. He asked the cave if it was safe to enter inside.

The cave did not respond to his question. He continued asking the same question again and again. The jackal told the cave that he wouldn’t enter the cave until he got a reply. The lion heard the jackal speaking. The lion replied like the cave at the fear of losing his prey. The jackal knew at once that the lion is inside the cave and ran far away from the cave.

Short Panchatantra Stories: Moral of the Story

One should always use their mind at its best. It can help you find a way out of the most difficult situations.

Read Also: Panchatantra Stories- Moral Stories for Kids

 

Elephants and Hares

Once upon a time, a herd of mighty elephants lived in a dense forest. The herd of the elephant would use their strength to torment other animals living in the forest. They always occupied the little pond in the jungle. There lived a bunch of rabbits nearby in a bush. The elephants made it impossible for the hares to drink water from the pond. The hares assembled to chalk out a strategy to keep the elephants away from the pond. They decide to teach the elephants a lesson. The king of the hares went to the elephant king and presented their problem. The elephant king snubbed him.

Read Also: Children and Moral Values

The hare king then warned the elephant that the moon, the god of the pond is highly disappointed with the behaviour of the elephants. He also tells the elephant king that he was sent by the moon god as his messenger. The elephant refused to trust the hare and walked with him to the pond to rectify what the hare was saying. The hare took the elephant to the pond on a full moon night. When the elephant walked towards the pond, he saw the reflection of the moon. The elephant thought that moon god has descended to the pond to show his rage. The elephant then promised the hare that his herd wouldn’t be a problem anymore for the hares.

Short Panchatantra Stories: Moral of the Story

Being witty is more important than being mighty.

 

Of Crows and Owls

Once upon a time, the birds of the jungle were disappointed in their king, Garuda. They gathered for a meeting to discuss what to do about the king who is too busy to protect them. The crows did not show up at the meeting. The birds decided to elect their new king. All of them came up with reasons why should he/she come to power. After a lot of discussions, the birds agreed that the owl can see at night and should be made the king.

Read Also: Inspirational Stories for Children

But on the day of the coronation, a crow who known to be very wise came. He asked the birds why did they appoint the ugly owl as their king. On hearing the reason for their choice, the crow pointed out the flaws in the owl. The crow told the birds that though the owl can see at night but he can’t protect the birds in the day. He suggested that Garuda should remain the king. The birds reconsidered their decision and cancelled the coronation. The owl was left disappointed and was feeling betrayed. He then declared that owls and crows shall never be friends. When the crow was left alone for thinking, he was in deep regret of the decision that he had made.

Short Panchatantra Stories: Moral of the Story

Do not offer advice unless you have been requested upon.

Read Also: Mushroom Soup

The Thief, The Brahmin And The Demon

Once upon a time, a poor Brahmin and a rich merchant lived in a village. The Brahmin was so poor that he was unable to fetch two square meals for himself. The rich merchant was moved by the plight of the poor Brahmin. He decided to give two calves to the Brahmin. The Brahmin took care of the calves and raised them with great care. The calves became strong bullocks. The brahmin ploughed his land with the help of these bullocks and was able to meet his needs.

Read Also: 5 Moral Values for Kids – A Child Must Have

There were a thief and a demon in the same village who had eyes on the bullocks. Both of them wanted the bullocks for themselves. One night when the thief came to steal the bullocks, he noticed that the demon was already there. Both of them got into an argument about who should have the animals. Their argument woke the Brahmin up from sleep. The Brahmin started chanting a sacred mantra and the demon disappeared. The demon flew away. Seeing the demon fly away, the thief also ran from the Brahmin’s house.

Short Panchatantra Stories: Moral of the Story

When two people fight, the third person always gets the benefit.

 

Beautifully illustrated, ‘Vishnu Sharma’s Complete Illustrated Panchatantra’ will be the ideal addition to a child’s library.

short Panchatantra stories